A Century of Lawmaking for a New Nation: U.S. Congressional Documents and Debates, 1774 – 1875

This is the lie in history that helps hide how our standing in law was switched from Constitutional to corporate. And CANNABIS laws are of a corporate jurisdiction see 27 CFR 72.11.
Most Americans don’t know there was a different 13th Amendment. It was proposed just four years before the 13th Amendment, ending Involuntary Slavery in 1865. It would have secured slavery as a State Right (12 Stat. 251, 36th Congress,http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage?collId=llsl&fileName=012%2Fllsl012.db&recNum=282 This proposed 13th Amendment was called the Corwin Amendment.
On February 28, 1861, the House of Representatives approved the Resolution by a vote of 133-65. On March 2, the United States Senate also adopted the Corwin Amendment with a vote of 24-12.
Since proposed Constitutional Amendment require a 2/3 majority vote, 132 votes were required in the House and 24 in the Senate. As seven Southern States had already decided to succeed from the Union, those states chose not to vote on the Corwin Amendment. Thus, showing a lot of the Northern support for this Pro-Slavery Amendment just before the start of the Civil War.
This Corwin Amendment is an Amendment to the United States Constitution proposed by Congress on March 2, 1861, as House Resolution No. 80. This was originally suggested by President James Buchanan (Mr. President James Buchanan endorsed the Corwin Amendment by taking the unusual step of signing it.). It was then drafted by a committee chaired by Representative Thomas Corwin of Ohio. Its purpose was to persuade states that permitted Slavery that the Federal Government would not interfere with Slavery in places where it already existed. So, pursuant to Article V of the Constitution, consideration of the Corwin Amendment then shifted to the State Legislatures. 
On May 13, 1861, the Ohio General Assembly became the first to ratify the Amendment. In January 1862, Maryland General Assembly was next to ratifying the Amendment. Later that year, Illinois approved the Amendment while they were sitting in session as a State Constitutional Convention rather than as a Legislature. Thus, causing some to see this particular ratification as possibly invalid. Note Ohio, Maryland, and Illinois were states that we are taught in history that fought to free the slaves. Plus look at the dates. All three states ratified this evil Amendment after the civil war had started on April 15, 1861. Moreover not one southern state has ever ratified it.
So, if the South had left the Union just because Slavery, then why would the Southern Political Forces that is then not plan to stay within the Union to support proposed Corwin 13th Amendment?
In Abraham Lincoln’s first Inaugural Address, he supported the Corwin Amendment: “Holding such a provision to now be implied Constitutional law, I have no objection to its being made express and irrevocable.”
Then, just weeks prior to the outbreak of the Civil War, Lincoln even pinned a letter to each Governor asking for them to support the Corwin Amendment.
Technically, the Corwin Amendment is still pending. It would need additional 35 or 36 ratifications, depending on Illinois ratification, in order to become part of the Constitution.
In 1963, a resolution to ratify the Corwin Amendment was introduced in Texas State Legislature. Remember this was proposed a month before Fort Sumter was fired upon. The war could have been avoided if slavery was in fact the only issue. In all reality, here in America no matter what race or religion you might practice, we all have one thing in common: As far as liberty is concerned we’re all in the same boat and its sinking. If We the People don’t learn to become One People in the very near future we may not even have the illusion of being a Constitutionally Free People much longer. Let’s all as one People fix the leak in the ship of Liberty!
Check out http://www.lib.niu.edu/2006/ih060934.html. Quoted from the site “The discovery of the newly inaugurated President Abraham Lincoln to the governor of Florida has generated renewed interest in Lincoln’s views toward slavery. The letter, found at the Lehigh County Historical Society in Allentown, Pennsylvania, is a form letter from Lincoln to Governor Madison S. Perry transmitting “an authenticated copy” of a Joint Resolution to amend the Constitution of the United States su. On March 16, 1861, Lincoln sent the letter to all of the Governors of the States, supporting the Corwin Amendment including states that had already succeeded from the Union and formed their own Confederate Government. In addition to, when did Abraham Lincoln first address freeing the Slaves? It was only when Lincoln was losing the war with the South that he issued the Emancipation Proclamation, September 22, 1862, in the mid of war. Over a year after the Civil War started in April 15, 1861. This is where he established a purpose for the war and proclaimed that Slaves in the Nations of the Confederate States were free.
Mr. Lincoln’s statements of his first Inaugural Address, on March 4, 1861, around 41 days before the start of the Civil War: “I have no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of Slavery in the States where it exists. I believe I have no lawful right to do so, and I have no inclination to do so”.
Abraham Lincoln’s letter to Horace Greeley, August 22, 1862, stated in part: “My paramount object in this struggle is to save the Union without freeing any slave I would do it, and if I could save it by freeing all the slaves I would do it; and if I could save it by freeing some and leaving others alone I would also do that. What I do about slavery, and the colored race, I do because I believe it helps to save the Union”.
From the 4th Lincoln and Douglas debate, August 21, 1858, Lincoln stated: “I will say then that I am not, nor ever have been in favor of bringing about in anyway the social and political equality of the white and black races – that I am not nor ever have been in favor of making voters or jurors of negroes, nor of qualifying them to hold office, nor to intermarry with white people; and I will say in addition to this that there is a physical difference between the white and black races which I believe will forever forbid the two races living together on terms of social and political equality.

 

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