Model for Other States with a Liquor Control Board

Model for Other States with a Liquor Control Board

Posted by Mrs. Ratsrectum on Dec 3 2012

From Wikipedia:

If you get Pennsylvania on board, the state will also regulate hempseed products made for human consumption, so that could pave the way for industrial hemp production, since the state relies heavily on agriculture. There are a host of other states in the list below that are not already MMJ states. Washington state’s model saves them from reinventing the wheel and having to correct any mistakes along the way. They can just learn from whatever Washington state adjusts or rectifies along the way.  Or they can consult with PUFMM – USA on facebook, which seems to have the market cornered, metaphorically, unlocking the plants fruit for the masses.

The 18 control or monopoly jurisdictions as of June 2012 are:
Alabama (Liquor stores are state-run or on-premise establishments with a special off-premise license.)[2]
Idaho (Maintains a monopoly over sales of beverages with greater than 16% ABV.)
Iowa (Does not operate retail outlets. Passed a bill in March 2010, allowing high-proof beer to be privately distributed.)[3]
Maine (State-contracted to private businesses for commission)
Maryland (Under state law the counties of Montgomery, Somerset, Wicomico and Worcester are county alcohol controlled which mandates that off-premise liquor sales are to be conducted only at county owned and operated dispensaries/stores. One exception exists in Montgomery County, four grocery stores had their licenses grandfathered prior to the change of the law.[4] Until recently Dorchester County was an alcohol control county until the County Council voted to permanently shutter the county owned liquor dispensaries.)
Michigan (Does not operate retail outlets; maintains a monopoly over wholesaling of distilled spirits only.)
Mississippi (State-contracted liquor stores)
Montana (State-contracted liquor stores, modeled after the Alberta Gaming and Liquor Commission)[5]
New Hampshire (Beer and wine can be sold at supermarkets & convenience stores; spirits and liqueurs are sold only in state-run liquor stores.)
North Carolina (Beer and wine can be sold in supermarkets and convenience stores; other spirits must be sold in liquor stores owned by local ABC boards. The State ABC Commission controls wholesale distribution and oversees local ABC boards.)
Ohio (Licenses businesses to run liquor stores for a commission; these stores have a monopoly on sales of beverages with greater than 21% ABV.)
Oregon (Beer and wine can be sold in supermarkets and convenience stores; other spirits must be sold in liquor stores operated and managed by state-appointed liquor agents who act as independent contractors under the supervision of the OLCC.)
Pennsylvania (All liquor stores [wine and spirits] are run by the state. Recently, there have been state-run retail outlets in the form of automated kiosks, opened inside some supermarkets; currently, 19 supermarkets have this.[6] Malt beverages are sold in case lots by distributors and in smaller quantities by on-premise establishments.)
Utah (all beverages over 3.2% ABW [4.0% ABV] are sold in state-run stores, Utah code 5(a)(i))[7]
Vermont (Liquor stores are state-contracted and licensed)
Virginia (Beer and wine ?14% ABV sold at supermarkets and convenience stores; all liquor stores are run by the state)
West Virginia (Does not operate retail outlets; maintains a monopoly over wholesaling of distilled spirits only.)
Wyoming (Does not operate retail outlets)

Several Municipalities in Minnesota and South Dakota are also control jurisdictions, where the revenue generated from alcohol sales goes directly to the municipality.

Surprisingly Florida did not make the cut.

About one-quarter of the United States population lives in control or monopoly states.

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