Archive for the ‘ Security & Privacy ’ Category

Cannabigerol aka CBG (not THC or CBD…)

Cannabigerol helps grow new brain cells.  It’s a no-brainer (heh) to use it in cases of head injuries or disorders??!

Ask anyone related to head injuries why they were never told to use this element.  They will not get a serious answer from the doctor who prescribes the contrary medications being pushed by the empire of LEGAL drugs in America.

Dr Sanja Gupta

Can and will this misery ever end?  THEY HAVE BEEN IGNORANT TO THE FACTS FOR OVER VARIOUS DECADES!!!

Many are counting on that CHANGE… Mr. President… Even Dr. Sunja Gupta has given into nature, all your bases belong to us… (the people)… AYBBTU

The Whole World is Watching.  Join us on http://www.Facebook.com/MarihuanaNews !

Legalize Cannabis Nationwide along with Hemp stalks while the bigots are tied up with their internal wars.  No sense in dragging out others wars that bring no benefit.  If human casualty surpasses the benefits… then it is UN-NECESSARY.

Planta Med. 1987 Jun;53(3):277-80.

Identification of a new chemotype in Cannabis sativa: cannabigerol-dominant plants, biogenetic and agronomic prospects.

PMID:  3628560

 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

LinkOut – more resources

Full Text Sources

1Enough is Enough!  Join us at The American Activist Project on facebook here:

Facebook.com/groups/TAMAP (We have a chat room too. )

Insane Bong & Pipe Ban signed by FL Gov Rick Scott. 2x = Felony!

Submitted by WildSatchmo in June 2013

That’s right, starting July 1st smoking devices are now illegal in Florida. Anyone found in possession of a pipe two times (even if it has never been used) becomes a third degree felon. In Florida, this means you are permanently banned from voting. For a fucking pipe.

With one swoop of the pen Rick Scott may have put thousands of companies out of business, and their employees looking for jobs. They also need to offload their entire inventory before July 1st when the bill goes into effect (yea, only a couple weeks from now).

The bill I’m talking about is FL HB49 / SB1140

Specifically the bill bans:

(a) Metal, wooden, acrylic, glass, stone, plastic, or ceramic pipes, with or without screens, permanent screens, hashish heads, or punctured metal bowls
(b) Water pipes.
(c) Carburetion tubes and devices.
(d) Chamber pipes.
(e) Carburetor pipes.
(f) Electric pipes.
(g) Air-driven pipes.
(h) Chillums.
(i) Bongs.
(j) Ice pipes or chillers.

Bill Text: http://www.myfloridahouse.gov/Sections/Bills/billsdetail.asp…

See for yourself. Governer’s Action: Approved
http://www.myfloridahouse.gov/Sections/Documents/loaddoc.asp…

From the final report:
Establishes the following five drug paraphernalia crimes:
1. use or possession of drug paraphernalia
2. manufacture or delivery of drug paraphernalia
3. delivery of drug paraphernalia to a minor
4. transportation of drug paraphernalia
5. advertisement of drug paraphernalia

Another disturbing revelation in the final analysis of the bill:

“…the Criminal Justice Impact Conference determined that SB 1140, which is similar to
CS/CS/HB 49, will increase the state prison bed population….”

The criminal justice committee met about the bill and noted in their summary:
“The bill may have a negative fiscal impact on state and local governments.”

“it may
have a negative prison bed impact on the Department of Corrections.”

“The bill does not appear to have any impact on state revenues.”

My previous post on this issue: http://www.dailypaul.com/283832/insane-bill-banning-bongs-pi…

Aaaaand.. Rick Scott’s facebook page.

https://www.facebook.com/scottforflorida?fref=ts

The Top Five Special Interest Groups Lobbying To Keep Marijuana Illegal

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Last year, over 850,000 people in America were arrested for marijuana-related crimes. Despite public opinion, the medical community, and human rights experts all moving in favor of relaxing marijuana prohibition laws, little has changed in terms of policy.

There have been many great books and articles detailing the history of the drug war. Part of America’s fixation with keeping the leafy green plant illegal is rooted in cultural and political clashes from the past.

However, we at Republic Report think it’s worth showing that there are entrenched interest groups that are spending large sums of money to keep our broken drug laws on the books:

1.) Police Unions: Police departments across the country have become dependent on federal drug war grants to finance their budget. In March, we published a story revealing that a police union lobbyist in California coordinated the effort to defeat Prop 19, a ballot measure in 2010 to legalize marijuana, while helping his police department clients collect tens of millions in federal marijuana-eradication grants. And it’s not just in California. Federal lobbying disclosures show that other police union lobbyists have pushed for stiffer penalties for marijuana-related crimes nationwide.

2.) Private Prisons Corporations: Private prison corporations make millions by incarcerating people who have been imprisoned for drug crimes, including marijuana. As Republic Report’s Matt Stoller noted last year, Corrections Corporation of America, one of the largest for-profit prison companies, revealed in a regulatory filing that continuing the drug war is part in parcel to their business strategy. Prison companies have spent millions bankrolling pro-drug war politicians and have used secretive front groups, like the American Legislative Exchange Council, to pass harsh sentencing requirements for drug crimes.

3.) Alcohol and Beer Companies: Fearing competition for the dollars Americans spend on leisure, alcohol and tobacco interests have lobbied to keep marijuana out of reach. For instance, the California Beer & Beverage Distributors contributed campaign contributions to a committee set up to prevent marijuana from being legalized and taxed.

4.) Pharmaceutical Corporations: Like the sin industries listed above, pharmaceutical interests would like to keep marijuana illegal so American don’t have the option of cheap medical alternatives to their products. Howard Wooldridge, a retired police officer who now lobbies the government to relax marijuana prohibition laws, told Republic Report that next to police unions, the “second biggest opponent on Capitol Hill is big PhRMA” because marijuana can replace “everything from Advil to Vicodin and other expensive pills.”

5.) Prison Guard Unions: Prison guard unions have a vested interest in keeping people behind bars just like for-profit prison companies. In 2008, the California Correctional Peace Officers Association spent a whopping $1 million to defeat a measure that would have “reduced sentences and parole times for nonviolent drug offenders while emphasizing drug treatment over prison.” Continue reading

Toxicological Adverse Effects

Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) and more

ctep.cancer.gov/reporting/ctc.html

Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) and Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC).

  • A key element of the reorientation of toxicity testing is the way in which adverse effects are understood, the topic of this post. Currently, the adverse effects “credible publications” are manipulated by the gov .. why?!??   Answer: corruption/profit.  This should cease and desist, humans should not be hurt & abused for profits in a republic where democracy thrives and justice prevails.

What is Toxicology?

www.toxicologysource.com/whatistoxicology.html

Toxicology is the study of the adverse effects of chemicals on living systems, whether they be human, animal, plant or microbe.

Our #PUFMM Links

ENJOY!

 

 

Medical marijuana monopoly

Currently, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) has a monopoly on the supply of research-grade marijuana, but no other Schedule I drug, that can be used in FDA-approved research. NIDA uses its monopoly power to obstruct research that conflicts with its vested interests. MAPS had two of its FDA-approved medical marijuana protocols rejected by NIDA, preventing the studies from taking place. MAPS has also been trying without success for almost four years to purchase 10 grams of marijuana from NIDA for research into the constituents of the vapor from marijuana vaporizers, a non-smoking drug delivery method that has already been used in one FDA-approved human study.

NIDA has a government granted monopoly on the production of medical marijuana for research purposes. In the past, the institute has refused to supply marijuana to researchers who had obtained all other necessary federal permits. Medical marijuana researchers and activists claim that NIDA, which is not supposed to be a regulatory organization, does not have the authority to effectively regulate who does and doesn’t get to do research with medical marijuana. Jag Davies of the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) writes in MAPS Bulletin:[27]

NIDA administers a contract with the University of Mississippi to grow the nation’s only legal cannabis crop for medical and research purposes,[28] including the Compassionate Investigational New Drug program. A Fast Company magazine article pointed out, “Based on the photographic evidence, NIDA’s concoction of seeds, stems, and leaves more closely resembles dried cat brier than cannabis”.[29] An article in Mother Jones magazine describes their crop as “brown, stems-and-seeds-laden, low-potency pot—what’s known on the streets as “schwag””aka “Bobby Brown”[30] United States federal law currently registers cannabis as a Schedule I drug. Medical marijuana researchers typically prefer to use high-potency marijuana, but NIDA’s National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse has been reluctant to provide cannabis with high THC levels, citing safety concerns:[28]

Most clinical studies have been conducted using cannabis cigarettes with a potency of 2-4% THC. However, it is anticipated that there will be requests for cannabis cigarettes with a higher potency or with other mixes of cannabinoids. For example, NIDA has received a request for cigarettes with an 8% potency. The subcommittee notes that very little is known about the clinical pharmacology of this higher potency. Thus, while NIDA research has provided a large body of literature related to the clinical pharmacology of cannabis, research is still needed to establish the safety of new dosage forms and new formulations.

Speaking before the National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse, Rob Kampia of the Marijuana Policy Project criticized NIDA for refusing to provide researcher Donald Abrams with marijuana for his studies, stating that “after nine months of delay, Dr. Leshner rejected Dr. Abrams’ request for marijuana, on what we believe are political grounds that the FDA-approved protocol is inadequate.”[31]

In May 2006, the Boston Globe reported that:[32]

Then again, it’s not in NIDA’s job description-or even, perhaps, in NIDA’s interests-to grow a world-class marijuana crop. The institute’s director, Nora Volkow, has stressed that it’s “not NIDA’s mission to study the medicinal use of marijuana or to advocate for the establishment of facilities to support this research.” Since NIDA’s stated mission “is to lead the Nation in bringing the power of science to bear on drug abuse and addiction,” federally supported marijuana research will logically tilt toward the potential harms, not benefits, of cannabis.

Ricaurte’s monkeys

For more details on this topic, see Retracted article on neurotoxicity of ecstasy.

NIDA has drawn criticism for continuing to provide funding to George Ricaurte, who in 2002 conducted a study that was widely touted as proving that MDMA causeddopaminergic neurotoxicity in monkeys.[33] His paper “Severe Dopaminergic Neurotoxicity in Primates After a Common Recreational Dose Regimen of MDMA (‘Ecstasy’)” inScience[34] was later retracted after it became clear that the monkeys had in fact been injected not with MDMA, but with extremely high doses of methamphetamine.[35] A FOIArequest was subsequently filed by MAPS to find out more about the research and NIDA’s involvement in it.[36][37]

Alan Leshner, publisher of Science and former director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), has come under fire for endorsing the botched study at its time of publication… Leshner did help NIDA bring home the bacon: NIDA’s budget for Ecstasy research has more than quadrupled over the past five years, from $3.4 million to $15.8 million; the agency funds 85 percent of the world’s drug-abuse research. In 2001, Leshner testified before a Senate subcommittee on “Ecstasy Abuse and Control”; critics say Leshner manipulated brain scans from a 2000 study by Dr. Linda Chang showing no difference between Ecstasy users and control subjects. But NIDA insists it’s independent from political pressures. “We don’t set policy; we don’t create laws,” says Beverly Jackson, the agency’s spokesperson.

Effectiveness of anti-marijuana ad campaigns

In February 2005, Westat, a research company hired by NIDA and funded by The White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, reported on its five-year study of the government ad campaigns aimed at dissuading teens from using marijuana, campaigns that cost more than $1 billion between 1998 and 2004. The study found that the ads did not work: “greater exposure to the campaign was associated with weaker anti-drug norms and increases in the perceptions that others use marijuana.” NIDA leaders and the White House drug office did not release the Westat report for a year and a half. NIDA dated Westat’s report as “delivered” in June 2006. In fact, it was delivered in February 2005, according to the Government Accountability Office, the federal watchdog agency charged with reviewing the study.

HELLO WORLD – WELCOME TO YOUR AWAKENING!

Esoteric Agenda: FULL LENGTH MOVIE. WELCOME TO YOUR AWAKENING!

Open Message to Police & Military Departments!

Okay bro… are you mad? What war on what drugs?

http://www.businesspundit.com/15-of-todays-biggest-advocates-against-the-drug-war-and-police-brutality/?utm_source=scribol.com&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=scribol.com

I have been lurking behind the scene, calculating movements (fabricating social technology with real time facts – no scripts, no acts.) and promoting hacktivism (Anonymous, New Age Iluminati &  PUFMM) for some time now.  This is sad, that I have checkmate’d single handedly (YEAH RIGHT)… the evil people behind prohibition of cannabis aka marijuana/marihuana etc w.e


Today’s 15 Biggest Advocates Against Drug War & Police Brutality

Our world is constantly unsettled. There are few places that aren’t ravaged by crime, terror, and unrest, and America is no different. The American drug war began in 1969, when then-President Richard Nixon declared drug abuse to be a “serious national threat.” It’s true that drug abuse is awful and should be taken seriously, but the drug war has needlessly ruined or claimed the lives of a startling number of citizens and wasted billions of tax dollars. Furthermore, it has allowed drugs to flow through an unregulated market operated by dangerous, greedy people, putting users at an undue added risk to their lives. Today, many people are fighting to end the drug war — and their ranks include some former police officers. The following lists compiles some of today’s biggest advocates against the drug war, as well as the fight against police harassment, profiling, and brutality.

Ethan Nadelmann

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Ethan Nadelmann, a seasoned academic and writer, is best known as the founder and executive director of the Drug Policy Alliance, one of the leading organizations in the United States for drug policy reform. His organization operates offices in five states, as well as one for national affairs in Washington, D.C. In 2000, the Drug Policy Alliance spearheaded California’s Proposition 36, which allows defendants convicted of non-violent drug offenses to receive a probationary sentence over jail time. It has also founded a plethora of needle exchange and syringe access programs, which prevent the spread of HIV and other blood-borne diseases among drug users. Under Nadelmann’s leadership, the DPA has become one of the most effective organizations for inspiring positive change in drug reform in the United States.

George Soros

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The Drug Policy Alliancewas created via the merging of a number of smaller institutions, among them Nadelmann’s Lindesmith Center. The Lindesmith Center was created using funds provided by famed Hungarian-born philanthropist George Soros. Soros, whose net worth is currently more than 14 billion dollars, has a long history of backing progressive causes. He is chairman of the Open Societies Institute, which was founded to promote social, economic, and legal reform, as well as to protect human rights. Soros’s involvement with the Drug Policy Alliance is ongoing; he currently serves on the DPA’s board of directors.

Norm Stamper

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This former Chief of the Seattle Police Department first entered the national consciousness during the World Trade Organization’s Ministerial Conference in 1999, when he authorized the use of tear gas to break up protests against the meeting. These events led to his resignation (he was quoted as saying, “I made a major mistake”), and he has spent much of his time since working to expose the difficulties of policing, as well as advocating for drug reform. As a writer for progressive online news source The Huffington Post, Stamper has blogged about Marijuana legalization, domestic abuse, racism, homophobia, and the drug war (check out this enlightening article about police involvement in the political struggle for drug reform: Cops For and Against the Drug War). He recently published a book titled Breaking Rank, about “the dark side of American policing.”

Neill Franklin

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One group making fantastic strides in the fight against the drug war is LEAP: Law Enforcement Against Prohibition. Neill Franklin, the organization’s executive director, is a 34-year veteran of the Maryland State Police and Baltimore Police Department. After years of arresting all sorts of people involved in the drug trade—some relatively innocent, some incredibly guilty—Franklin was convinced by former Baltimore Mayor Kurt Schmoke that the drug war was instigating more violence than it was preventing. Aside from his work with LEAP, Franklin is involved with a number of community and religious councils.

Howard Wooldridge

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Howard Wooldridge led an 18-year career as a police officer and detective in Bath Township Michigan before his turn at drug reform advocacy. In 2002, he co-founded LEAP. In 2003, he rode a horse named Misty 6,400 miles on saddleback from California to New York in order to encourage citizens to oppose drug prohibition. He served for four years as LEAP’s envoy to Washington, D.C., and now he works with COPs: Citizens Opposing Prohibition. He’s also the producer of the nifty t-shirts featured above.

Stephen Downing

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Stephen Downingwas a Police Commander when Richard Nixon announced the War on Drugs. Following that, he was the Bureau Chief of the Los Angeles Police Department’s Narcotics Operation. In 2010, after his retirement, Downing spoke out in support of California’s Proposition 19, which would legalize the production, distribution, and consumption of Marijuana in the state. Downing claims that he changed his mind about policies regarding the drug when one of his undercover police officers were killed during an operation—he observed the senseless violence that prohibition of the drug inspired, and that outlawing marijuana put its distribution into the hands of street gangs. He now works as a representative for LEAP.

Joseph D. McNamara

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Joseph McNamarabegan his career in law enforcement as a beat cop in Harlem. In 1973, he became the Police Chief of Kansas City, Missouri, and three years later was appointed chief of San Jose, California, a position he held until his retirement in 1991. He’s a seasoned police veteran, a Harvard graduate, and a research fellow at the Hoover Institution; he is an expert on drug reform. In a panel discussion led by the National Review, McNamara pointed out that $500 worth of heroin could bring in as much $100,000 on the streets, which is why violent offenders are drawn to the drug trade. The reason behind this inflation? Drug prohibition. If the drugs aren’t so hard to obtain, they won’t produce as much revenue for those willing to sell them.

Leigh Maddox

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This former Maryland StatePolice Captain changed her attitude about the War on Drugs when a good friend of hers, an undercover police officer in Washington, D.C., was shot in the head during a sting. Now she advocates against violence, and is attempting to steer drug policy away from criminal prosecution and towards substance abuse treatment. Maddox now serves on the board for LEAP and currently lectures about escalating violence associated with global drug cartels.

Walter Cronkite

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Walter Cronkiteis renowned worldwide for his two-decade run as the anchor for the CBS Evening News. In the years following his retirement, he became involved in political activism, working for causes including hunger, religious tolerance, personal liberty, and, yes, drug reform. In a fundraising letter he penned on behalf of the Drug Policy Alliance before his death in 2009, he made his position clear: “The war on drugs is a failure.”

Gary Johnson

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In 1998, Republican then-Governor of New MexicoGary Johnson was campaigning reelection. His platform? The decriminalization of Marijuana. He won by a 10% margin. Johnson considered the War of Drugs to be a waste of money, and believed that drug addiction should be considered a health issue and not a criminal one, and pointed out that nearly half of the money spent on police, courts, and prisons were used to prosecute drug offenders. Johnson is currently bidding for a Republican nomination for the 2012 presidential election, and one of his central concerns is drug policy reform.

Carl Dix

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There is a flipside to all of this police involvement. We grant a great deal of power to our authority figures, and sometimes, when that power goes unchecked, it gets abused. Police brutality is startlingly common, and it has become necessary for certain organizations and individuals to prevent it from happening again. Carl Dix is one of those individuals. As the national spokesperson for America’s Revolutionary Communist Party, Dix advocates for revolution as a means to end injustice. He has appeared on CNN, C-SPAN, and been published in the Los Angeles Times, Boston Globe, and New York Times Magazine discussing identity politics and human rights. In the 1984 and 1988 presidential elections, Dix ran as the Revolutionary Communist Party’s “anti-candidate.”

De Lacy Davis

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As the leader of Black Cops Against Police Brutality, Brother Sergeant De Lacy Davisspends his time advocating for the rights of people who were treated unfairly—and sometimes killed—by law enforcement officers such as himself. Davis began his career in 1986 with the police department in East Orange, New Jersey. He spent four years as the president of the Northeast chapter of the National Black Police Association, and was promoted to sergeant in 1998. De Lacy acts as a representative from his trade, traveling as far as Ghana and Rome to promote the rights of individual citizens. He has appeared on numerous television programs, from MTV News to Ricki Lake to Oprah, and continues to devote his time to the cause against violence.

Copwatch

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Copwatch is a collection of activist organizations committed to observing and documenting police activity. They maintain a searchable online database (available here: http://www.copwatch.org/) which allows the general public to file or search complaints regarding police misconduct. Copwatch was founded in 1990 in Berkeley, California, when a group of activists decided to document police activity during a series of attacks on the homeless at People’s Park in the city’s Telegraph Avenue neighborhood. Now Copwatch organizations exist in cities all over the country—and anyone can get involved.

The Black Panther Party

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It was the position of the legendary Black Panther Partyof the 1960s and 70s that police departments were institutionalizing abuse towards minorities. In 1966, when the party formed in Oakland, California, it organized a number of neighborhood patrols, which were sent to observe and document police activity. Black Panthers would often follow officers on their beats, which sometimes ended in bloody confrontations. These methods, which have since been refined by groups like Copwatch, laid the ground for modern police brutality advocacy.

Cory Doctorow

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Many people would recognize Cory Doctorow as a nerdy Internet maven, blogger, science-fiction writer, and a co-editor of the popular website Boing-Boing, but he’s also an advocate for a concept he refers to as “reverse surveillance.” Doctorow considers certain “Big Brother”-style modern police states (Like London, which recently placed closed circuit television cameras on nearly every one of its blocks) to be gathering too much information. The amount of data that compile about their citizens is so gargantuan that it becomes entirely unusable. In this opinion piece he wrote for the London Guardian, he explains how gathering data on innocent citizens makes crime detection impossible, referring to criminal incidents as “needles buried in a haystack of irrelevancies.”

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